Cid's Obscure Nostalgia

Apr 21
Apr 21
guardian:

Ukraine crisis: Geneva deal hangs by a thread as five people die in Slavyansk
The tentative Geneva deal to resolve the Ukraine crisis is hanging by a thread after as many as five people were killed in a gun battle near the volatile eastern town of Slavyansk early on Sunday.
An Easter truce declared by the authorities in Kiev was rudely shattered after two groups opened fire on each other overnight. Full story
Photograph: Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images

guardian:

Ukraine crisis: Geneva deal hangs by a thread as five people die in Slavyansk

The tentative Geneva deal to resolve the Ukraine crisis is hanging by a thread after as many as five people were killed in a gun battle near the volatile eastern town of Slavyansk early on Sunday.

An Easter truce declared by the authorities in Kiev was rudely shattered after two groups opened fire on each other overnight. Full story

Photograph: Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images

Apr 21

quote On a day like today, my master William Faulkner said, “I decline to accept the end of man.” I would fall unworthy of standing in this place that was his, if I were not fully aware that the colossal tragedy he refused to recognize thirty-two years ago is now, for the first time since the beginning of humanity, nothing more than a simple scientific possibility. Faced with this awesome reality that must have seemed a mere utopia through all of human time, we, the inventors of tales, who will believe anything, feel entitled to believe that it is not yet too late to engage in the creation of the opposite utopia. A new and sweeping utopia of life, where no one will be able to decide for others how they die, where love will prove true and happiness be possible, and where the races condemned to one hundred years of solitude will have, at last and forever, a second opportunity on earth.

— In the wake of Gabriel García Márquez’s death, wisdom from his 1982 Nobel Prize acceptance speech. Complement with Faulkner’s iconic 1950 Nobel speech on the role of the writer as a booster of the human heart, which Márquez bows to here. (via explore-blog)
Apr 20
coolchicksfromhistory:

Park Ji-Young (photo via reddit), the 22 year old cafeteria worker who lost her life helping to evacuate the Sewal ferry disaster.  
Transcript: Passengers couldn’t escape South Korean ferry, crew member says (CNN)

coolchicksfromhistory:

Park Ji-Young (photo via reddit), the 22 year old cafeteria worker who lost her life helping to evacuate the Sewal ferry disaster.  

Transcript: Passengers couldn’t escape South Korean ferry, crew member says (CNN)

Apr 20

quote Moleskine is very good at telling stories. The question is whether people are interested in hearing this new one. The company’s revenue continues to grow each year. Customers remain willing to buy Moleskine notebooks. They are also willing to engage with the brand online—but only to a point.

Adrienne Raphel on Moleskine’s foray into the digital world: http://nyr.kr/1mcX11z (via newyorker)
Apr 20

bookstorey:

John Lehmann’s New Writing


In 1936 at the age of 29 the poet John Lehmann (1907 - 1987) launched a new monthly literary journal, New Writing, which became the mouthpiece for a generation of writers that included Cecil Day Lewis, W.H. Auden and Christopher Isherwood. These writers, who were too young to have fought in the First World War but old enough to have been left deeply traumatized by it, felt themselves to be overlooked, misunderstood and ignored by the older generation and subsequently felt a keen sense of isolation.


Whereas Lehmann characterized the older generation as ‘sympathetic observers’ (his description of Virginia Woolf with whom he had a fraught artistic and business relationship at Hogarth Press), he believed the artist’s role was not merely to reflect, but also to actively participate in shaping political and social events. With New Writing he wanted to bridge the gap between the author and reader: to create 'an effective brotherhood border between victims of oppression' and the 'sense of broader comradeships.'


The inclusion within New Writing’s pages of biographies and photographic snapshots of the writers, and himself as editor, were an attempt by Lehmann to develop personas that he hoped would breed a sense of their familiarity among its readers. Photographic images, of not just the writers, also played an important part in his design. He used them to share art from home and abroad alongside scenes from everyday life in order to blur the lines of distinction between the two.


Although Lehmann recognized that he ultimately failed in his ambition to bring the writer and the reader closer together (and just as the magazine had turned its back on the previous generation, in 1950 it found itself snubbed by the one that followed), New Writing has been deservedly described as a 'collective masterpiece of a generation.'


The books in the photographs are Penguin paperback issues of volumes No. 5 (April 1941) and No. 32 (1947) that contain prose and poetry from C. Day Lewis, W.H Auden, Edith Sitwell and Lawrence Durrell. The magazine was initially published by Bodley Head and continued to appear sporadically in hardback format till 1946. Its move to Penguin in 1940, where it ran for 40 editions until 1950, no doubt, broadened its popularity and helped it to secure a reliable source of paper in a period of scarcity during the Second World War. Its first Penguin edition also contained the first publication of George Orwell’s essay Shooting the Elephant (1940).


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Apr 20

The lack of apostrophe in their name’s bugging me, but awesome song!

Apr 19

Impressed and confused…

Apr 19

Wow… Took two years to finally start liking her…

Apr 19

Poetry quiz: can you match these first lines to their poem titles? | OxfordWords blog →